NECSS Workshops

In addition to the main conference programming Friday, Saturday and Sunday NECSS will offer educational (and fun!) workshops on Thursday April 9. Two concurrent tracks will be offered, comprised of four workshops each. Registration is strictly limited to 25 attendees per workshop.

Event Details

Date: Thursday April 9
Time: 10:00AM – 05:00PM
Registration: $35 individually or $100 for a four-workshop multipass
Location: Seminar Rooms 5 and 9 (enter at the FIT Conference Center on 28th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues)

Please note — Main conference registration is required to register for workshops. Due to anticipated demand, Brian Wecht and Jay Novella’s workshop on social media is being offered on both tracks.

Time
Description
Workshop 1
10:00AM – 11:15AM

Track A: Viewing Futurism Skeptically


Leader: John Rennie

Futurists often make extraordinary claims about the prospects for new technologies and their effects on society. How can we better identify which ones suffer from naivety, over-optimism, ignorance, or hucksterism? John Rennie, science writer and former editor in chief of Scientific American, will look at what to believe about nanotechnology, A.I.,”fusion (both hot and cold!), the Singularity, and more.

Track B: Science Using a Handheld Microscope


Leader: Latasha Wright

In this workshop, participants will explore how to make the ordinary, extraordinary, exploring the world around us through the lens of a microscope. Participants will also learn about how to develop engaging, hands-on curricula that engender enthusiasm for science for students of all ages.

Workshop 2
11:30AM – 12:45PM

Track A: The Art of Communicating Science to the Public


Leader: Stephen Hall

How do you communicate the complexities of modern science and technology to the general public? In this workshop, science writer Stephen S. Hall will walk participants through the seven key steps of scientific communication, from understanding your audience to knowing the rules of explanatory logic.

Track B: Ask a Biologist!


Leader: Yelena Bernadskaya

What’s the difference between the Arctic Apple and the GM Salmon? Why are Haeckel’s embryo illustrations misleading? Is the peppered moth observation really useless? What is “the worm inside us”? Join Yelena Bernadskaya, Ph.D, a Developmental Biology Fellow at NYU, as she takes your questions about biology, evolution, and more (seriously, you can ask her anything — even the weird questions you’ve always been wondering about)!

12:45PM – 02:15PM
Lunch (not included)
Workshop 3
02:15PM – 03:30PM

Track A: Advanced Critical Thinking


Leader: Steve Novella

You’ve read Demon Haunted World, you listen to the Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe, you may even have been involved with skeptical investigations…but there’s always more to learn! In this workshop noted skeptical activist Dr. Steve Novella will discuss advanced concepts in critical thinking — how we fool ourselves, how we fool others, and what the latest research tells us about the nature of the critical thinking process.

Track B: Social Media, Science & Skepticism


Leader: Jay Novella and Brian Wecht

Brian Wecht (theoretical physicist, co-founder of The Story Collider, and half of the YouTube musical comedy duo Ninja Sex Party) and Jay Novella (co-host and producer of The Skeptics’ Guide To The Universe podcast) will examine how to most effectively communicate science and skeptical topics to the public using various social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and more.

Workshop 4
03:45PM – 05:00PM

Track A: Social Media, Science & Skepticism


Leader: Jay Novella and Brian Wecht

Brian Wecht (theoretical physicist, co-founder of The Story Collider, and half of the YouTube musical comedy duo Ninja Sex Party) and Jay Novella (co-host and producer of The Skeptics’ Guide To The Universe podcast) will examine how to most effectively communicate science and skeptical topics to the public using various social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and more.

Track B: The Science of Taste


Leader: Rachel Meyer

Attendees will explore the heritability and physiology of taste, the biochemical characteristics that produce difference flavor sensations, and how different plants work together (or against one another) to create pleasant (or unpleasant) taste sensations. We will explore how these concepts may be applied to world cuisines, “traditional” medicines, as well as contemporary cocktail culture and new approaches to food innovation. Attendees will have the opportunity to create their own (non-alcoholic) cocktails utilizing the concepts discussed in the workshop.